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The slogan „Above us, without us!“ (Czech: O n`s bez n`s!) sums up the feelings of the Czechoslovakian population (Slovakia and the Czech Republic) towards the agreement. [Citation required] On its way to Germany, Czechoslovakia (as the state was renamed) lost its reasonable border with Germany and its fortifications. Without it, its independence became more nominal than more real. The agreement also caused Czechoslovakia to lose 70% of its steel industry, 70% of its electricity and 3.5 million citizens to Germany. [61] The Sudeten Germans celebrated what they saw as their liberation. The impending war, it seemed, had been averted. On 30.m September, 11 hours after the Czechoslovakian government agreed to the Munich terms, Poland issued an ultimatum to the Czechoslovakian government. [78] It demanded the immediate evacuation of Czechoslovakian troops and police and gave Prague until noon the next day. On 1 October at 11:45 a.m. .m.

the Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry called the Polish ambassador in Prague to tell him that Poland could get what it wanted, but then asked for a 24-hour delay. On 2 October, the Polish army, under the command of General W. Bortnowski, annexed an area of 801.5 km2 with 227,399 inhabitants. The attached area was divided between Frysztat County and Cieszyn County. [79] At the same time, Slovakia lost 10,390 km2 to Hungary, which has a population of 854,277. (7) There is a right to vote in and out of the transferred territories, the possibility to exercise within six months from the date of this agreement. A German-Czechoslovakian commission defines the terms of the option, examines the possibilities of facilitating the transmission of the population and resolves the fundamental issues arising from this transfer. The Manchester Guardian covered every corner of history, from the details of the deal Chamberlain, which appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, to unease among other nations. One editorial found that the sheet of paper he was waving on his return to Britain was almost worthless. The New York Times made the front page of the Munich agreement: „Hitler receives less than his claims from the Sudetenland,“ and reports that a „joyful crowd“ had applauded Daladier on his return to France and that Chamberlain had been „wildly applauded“ upon his return to the UK.

[54] The Munich Convention (Czech: Mnichovska dohoda; in Slovak: Mnechovska dohoda; Munich Agreement) was an agreement on the Sudetenland crisis between the major European powers after a conference in Munich in 1938 that was signed on 30 September. The aim of the conference was to discuss the future of Czechoslovakia in the face of the territorial demands of the German dictator Adolf Hitler. The agreement signed by Nazi Germany, France, Great Britain and Italy authorized the German annexation of the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia. The Sudetenland were of immense strategic importance to Czechoslovakia, with most of its border defences located there. The agreement authorizing the annexation of the Sudetenland by Germany was signed on 29 September 1938. An agreement was reached on 29 September and.m on 30 September 1938, Adolf Hitler, Neville Chamberlain, Benito Mussolini and Edouard Daladier signed the Munich Agreement. The agreement was officially put in place by Mussolini, while the Italian plan was almost identical to Godesberg`s proposal: the German army was to complete the occupation of the Sudetenland by 10 October and an international commission should decide the future of other controversial territories.